Long-departed U.K. indie-pop act The Primitives — sometimes lumped together with the mid-to-late-’80s C86 scene — has somewhat quietly reformed, playing its first gigs in 17 years in its home country this month and even doing a bit of recording.

Without much fanfare, the band — best known for its jangly U.K. hit single “Crash” — performed a coming-out gig Oct. 2 at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum in Coventry for the opening of “More than Two Tones,” an exhibit dedicated to that city’s music scene and bands such as The Specials and The Zodiacs (that’s video above of “Crash” from the museum gig). Last night, the group played a second concert, at London’s Buffalo Bar.

The two concerts mark the Primitives’ first public performances since splitting in 1992 following the commercial failure of the band’s third album, Galore. They also follow the death in February of Steve Dullaghan, the group’s first bassist, who played on 1988’s Lovely; the band dedicated its first reunion concert to Dullaghan’s memory.

Lead singer Tracy Tracy, in an interview with It’s All About Coventry, says the Primitives have been rehearsing and even “recording a few tracks,” although she cautions that the band isn’t completely relaunching: “It’s not like the Primitives are reforming. It’s just we’ve got a few dates and we’ll have a bit of fun and see what happens.”

As for live dates, outside of the two October concerts, she says, “Maybe (some more) toward the end of the year, and then next year we’ll start fresh.”

See more live Primitives video, as well as Tracy Tracy’s interview, after the jump…

Video by It’s All About Coventry, Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, 10/2/09


 

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